Abe’s Odyssy. A turning point in Gaming History.

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Well I stumbled across a sweet gaming blog by the way of Rhino and I thought to myself, well… Gotta lift my game(in every sense of the word). I read an old post about how gamers used to get by before Google, and The Tangled Interwebs made it all too easy to source information for cheats, walk-throughs and handy hints. Wanna know how we used to do it? It was grind man. Fucking work that shit out until you’ve got it down and can do it with your eyes closed baby. There was no other way. When you’re 9 years old, your circle of friends is small at best, the knowledge between you consists of: How to eat boogers, Saturday Disney, Power Rangers and Girls are gross. Maybe one of the kids knows a little about pinching chocolate and another knows a little something else. They’re kids, they’re more than you see, and you understand less of what you observe. You’re out of touch mate, just like this new generation of “Gamers” and “Artists”.

Music is trash on the radio and the “Faces”(interchangeable with feces) of the gaming culture are mainly loudmouth kids making stupid noises, and giving no detail behind their movement or explanation to what we see. They get hits because they make stupid noises and it’s good for a gimmick, Pew die Pie. With but a very few favourites (Ben “Yahtzee” Croshaw aka Zero Punctuation, and a select few I keep reserved on a high shelf) being the exception to the rule.

 Remember when people used to play guitars, write their own songs and made it without being manufactured by the industry, for the industry? Bands like Nirvana, The Offspring, Metallica (before St Anger) ACDC, and Pantera all used to be massive on mainstream radio. These days it’s manufactured shit like Katy Perry (Who’s majority of hits are written by somebody else. Well an 8-12 sombodies who write most of the top hits by commercial artists. And it’s confirmed, I’ll put the link here to the source article) but moving on from my personal prejudice against manufactured fame and it being mistook for talent, let’s get to my overdue point on Abe’s Odyssy, and how the game signalled a turning point in the gaming culture.

Remember back to your first console… 

courtesy of BigFishGames.com
which quite possibly would have been one of these if you are of the middle generation (20-29) such as myself. If not, your first console might have been a PlayStation 2 or Xbox, in which case this article would seem irrelevant to you because, you know, the Internet. Before the Internet came along and everything was given to you by a refined search on one of the massive search engines or social media platforms, we used to use these things called ‘Virtues’. Patience is one of these virtues. Some of these games such as ‘Zelda: The legend of Link’ on The Nintendo Entertainment System required an obscene amount of this elusive virtue due to the lack of being able to save your progress by any conventional means. We didn’t have memory cards, internal memory, or cloud storage. We had a game we would play for 12 hours, pause the game and then turn the T.V. off to go to bed. The next day we would wake up bright eyed and bushy tailed, to continue our incredible grind hoping the game didn’t freeze overnight thus forcing us to start again. It was a nightmare, it was rewarding to beat the game, and most of all, you had to do it yourself. 
And then came the next gen consoles. SNES, 64, Ps1, GameCube, Dreamcast and a few other cultural gaming conceptions that should have been aborted. *But these ones came with memory options. It was an industrial revolution where technology lept and immediately made vintage consoles ancient history, and obsolete. A bittersweet moment to gamers around the world( for some reason I read that last bit as Yahtzee in my head, worked alright). We finally reach the topic of this post.
sourced from Wiki

For me, Abe’s Osyssy marked the time in gaming history when a platformer gave infinite lives as base, and the actions of the protagonist directly affected the outcome of the game. In this case, if you didn’t rescue the majority of the slave workers, then come the end of the game when you need their vote to ensure your survival,  you would die. There are probably plenty of earlier releases that have similar elements to their gameplay but I can’t think of one, and no offence to any gamers that can. You had to be vigilant, keep an eye on off screen locations where there could be half a dozen folks to rescue and haul ass time and time again until you got it right. Science bless the “quick save” feature on Abe’s Exodus. I loved this game. Trying to covertly rescue workers while evading the immense number of enemy guards, guards you could possess mentally and make shoot their buddies. It was fun. Some parts could only be completed by cheering up sad ones with hard to obtain energy drinks or farting and burping. So it was a combination of fun and and conscience that drove the player forward. Possibly the last great platform game too, considering this day and age. Think about it. I’m off, thanks for reading folks.
Nostalgia strikes hard and one is forced to subconsciously reminisce about games long completed but never forgotten. 
Posted from amongst the tangled interwebs.

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3 Comments Add yours

  1. Valiant effort and a fantastic read. To comment further on one of your points “Fucking work that shit out until you’ve got it down and can do it with your eyes closed baby. There was no other way.” you’re totally right! Not only that but the only people that could help you were your circle of friends or maybe a few folk who you saw in school or after school hours. There was no walkthrough provided in a video format. Just a few tips through word of mouth and a lot of retrying. We’ve definitely lost that nowadays. Great article man!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Amen, there’s no satisfaction like grinding hard and for it to pay off

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Damn it, accidentally pressed send like a moron. As I was saying, there’s nothing like the hard grind and watching it pay off. I’m stuck in my ways with gaming, I still love exploiting every glitch in Fable anniversary haha. Such a brilliant game.

      Liked by 1 person

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